– photographs and messages from inside the Sausurrean Bar –

Posts Tagged: sibylle


Posts Tagged ‘sibylle’

Monday, May 18th, 2015

DC Reporting in, #13: The Edgewalk

Lalala, backlog what backlog … .

I went to Toronto for FKO and early on decided that I was going to stay an extra day, and while at FKO I convinced K, S & W to do the Edgewalk on the CN Tower with me! Which was a tad scary but mostly awesome, and I am really glad that we all did this together. (Basically you walk around the tower, on top of its restaurant platform, outside).

CN Tower EdgeWalk-4
the Edgewalker
The tiny red guy is the Edgewalker who went on the walk after us, as seen from the Skypod on top of the Tower

Tuesday, August 19th, 2014

City of DiSF

IMG_8111.JPG

Or: What I did this long weekend. Now to pack my suitcase, as I have a 9am plane to catch. This, for me, was a really productive weekend. There are soooo many thoughts and ideas I am going away with.

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013

The Five of Me

The Five of Us

The next time the five of me meet, we’ll do it under artificial lighting!

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

The End of the Hiatus

So, the arm is totally less broken – not entirely as agile and muscled and whole as it was before I broke it, six weeks and two days ago, but definitely getting there (my physiotherapist says that I can expect to be back to my old strength by Christmas, so there’s quite a ways to go, mostly in regaining muscle mass and strength, as well as some flexibility – apparently you lose 50% of your muscle mass in the first week of not using a particular muscle, and elbow joints are very quick to become rigid…). I’m not really able to heft my camera, for one, so expect a mixture of unposted photos from my archives and mobile phone snapshots for the time being – but there definitely will be posts again, as there is no lack of unposted photos, and I am also allowed (and able) to type with both hands again.

Thanks for all your good wishes, and your patience during my absence!

Monday, July 8th, 2013

Hiatus

arm

Posting will resume when my arm is, uh, less broken again.

 

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

This woman is busy

Three conferences/conventions in four weekends make one thus – so this here is the only photo I am bringing you from DFDF. I’ve been to that hotel a number of times now, and yet the Narnia lamps always enchant me all over again. :-)

Also, while I wasn’t looking (see: busy), this website passed 100’000 visitors (and that in 2 years and 2 months)! Thanks for stopping by and reading everyone – no matter if it is here or in syndication elseweb.

Tuesday, June 11th, 2013

In the Ruins of Civilizations

In the Ruins of Civilizations

So, I have been – rather insistently and in fact, quite rightfully so – informed that I have yet to published more than a blurry photo of a box of books containing copies of In the Ruins of Civilizations (and which was only on twitter). This lack of a post is not due to the fact that I don’t want to write anything about my book, but rather that I always had this vague plan of making a really concise and yet well-written, shiny and comprehensive blog post about it, eclipsing all my other blog posts. Which, yeah … good luck with that. All my precision and conciseness and tweaking of sentences and passages and words and structures and … stuff … seems to go into my academic writing, and when I post to my blog I just … I don’t know … post to my blog? In a more meandering and rambly and slice-of-life kind of way?

(And so much for conciseness, I hear you mumble…).

But, yes, there’s this book. Which is also my PhD. That I wrote. And defended. And that then got published. And came out back in March. And which you most likely missed out on, newswise, as, like I said, all I did was tweet a photo of a box of books, as term had just started and things were reeeally busy and I wanted to make a powerfully eloquent entry.

This is what the back cover has to say about it:

Post-apocalyptic novels tell stories set after a global catastrophe has led to the ‘end of the world’. But only in the rarest of cases does the ‘end of the world’ actually mean the end of the planet (or even of the human race), and it is on what remains after the end of the world that this book focuses on. What is left of the world from ‘before’? How are these remnants depicted and how do survivors interact with them? What influence does the state of the physical world have on these interactions? How are these processes narrated, and on which narrative level?

To answer these questions, In the Ruins of Civilizations concisely covers the history and appeal of apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic tales and then focuses on four post-apocalyptic novels published in the 21st century – Margaret Atwood’s Oryx & Crake, Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, Bernard Beckett’s Genesis, and Robert C. Wilson’s Julian Comstock – a story of 22nd Century America. Its theoretical approach is based on the work of ruin theorists, analyses of the depiction of non-functional objects in literature, ecocriticism, socio-geographical readings of landscapes and wildernesses, as well as on theories of narrative levels, narrative communication and space in narrative. It shows that the interplay between narrative structures, world constructions, corporeal objects and physical realities forms the fundamental embodying locus of post-apocalyptic novels.

It was published by the Wissenschaftlicher Verlag Trier, and if you really want one, you can get a copy there. (I mean, that is, I’d be delighted if you wanted one, but it *is* more a book for the McCarthian scholar and ecocritics and P-A geeks and people interested in ruin theories than for, I don’t know, the fluffy chillaxing afternoon escapist reader).

And that is that – I don’t usually post about my academic writing/life on here much, but here you go.

Sunday, January 27th, 2013

How the light gets in

artsy chandelier photo

Monday, December 31st, 2012

Have a good 2013, everyone!

Happy 2013!

And thank you for reading (and commenting!!!) !

Saturday, December 22nd, 2012

Strange Things are Happening in the Attic

Is the attic haunted?

I’m home for Christmas, there’re going to be family pictures taken (and guess who gets to take them? :-)), and so it was high time to a) get and b) try out a proper/detachable flash for my camera, wouldn’t you say?

Err, yeah. That’s my story, and I’m sticking to it! ;-)

Edited to add: No copying people around in photoshop or anything like that occurred – the composition is like this on the camera chip itself.

Monday, June 25th, 2012

The Narnia Lamp

the narnia lamp

Wednesday, June 6th, 2012

More on the Transit of Venus

M has gracefully allowed me to post this photo of us here (I don’t post photos of other [non-famous] [sorry, M! :-)] people here without asking for permission first), and so here’s a photo of us at the city beach early this morning (~4:20am). As you can see, the atmosphere was lovely, and it would have been a morning well worth being out and about on even without Venus transiting in front of the sun. But transit it did, and so here’re some more photos of said event:

I took the last one with a UV filter that M brought and that I held in front of the lense of my camera – I like how you can spot Venus perfectly in the reflection that the combination of filter and camera produced, but not on the direct image of the sun itself.

We also got to see a false sunrise:

It was, generally speaking, simply just a wonderful morning – and considering that I just got home from our lecture series and improv rehearsal about 45 minutes ago definitely a long day. Definitely worth it thought! (If you want to see some more of my transit photos, click here!)

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012

Back in Germany

I made it back safe and sound to Germany, if on a different flight than originally planned – I was booked on a Lufthansa flight from Atlanta to Frankfurt for Monday evening, local time, but when I got to the airport my flight was cancelled due to a strike that was planned for Frankfurt airport for Tuesday. So, no flying to Frankfurt. After about an hour of waiting, I was rebooked on two United Flights, first Atlanta-Chicago (ORD) and then Chicago-Frankfurt. The itiniary gave me 35 minutes in ORD to make the connection, which left me somewhat skeptical, what with ORD being huge and needing to change terminals and all … . But I was game – I have friends in the Chicago area and I figured the worst that could happen would be an overnight stay in the Windy City, with possible no-warning meetup with friends, dinner on me. Or something like that. So I took myself and my luggage over to the United check in area, and what do you know, turns out the computer only had me on a flight to Chicago, but the connection to Frankfurt was missing … because the flight from ORD to FRA was … also cancelled. I was ready to hie myself back to Lufthansa and that point and to let them assign me a hotel or something (rueing only that I had had no advance warning, and so returned my rental car already), but the nice lady at the United booth whom I had inquired about my missing international connection about said “oh, but there’s a Delta plane leaving for Frankfurt at 4pm … let me see if that one’s still going and if they have room!”

The answer to both was yes, and so I got rebooked on that one, and ended up leaving two hours earlier than planned, on a plane that was about 20% empty. So much for the Lufthansa lady’s “we’re trying everything to get you all home” – everything Star Alliance, maybe, but not everything – I know some people (hey, you make contacts when waiting around with other people for different flights for 1h+) who got stranded for 24 hours, or who got a connection via Newark (where they got stranded), or, like me, got assigned the Chicago flight, but then not rebooked to Delta. It makes sense from a airline-network-rivalry point of view, but also makes the “we’re doing everything” a heap of untruth … I mean, having three seats to myself was nice, but I’d gladly have had less room and the guy that wanted to get home for his daughter’s birthday along for the trip … ya know?

But, home I am, and home-home at that, as I am in Mannheim right now, and shall remain here until Sunday – it’s my dad’s job leaving-do tomorrow, and it looks to be a grand party!

I’ve also had the two one-way disposable underwater camera films developed, the above photo being one of the pictures from them – more to follow, but once I’m reunited with my scanner – this one is here courtesy of the camera in my telephone only.

Monday, March 19th, 2012

Key West, FL

Key West

I made my way to Key West today, meandering along the key islands, which offered some nice views and an unexpected interesting and lovely conversation on Islamorada (I think it was Islamorada) (hi B, if you’re reading this! :-) ). Key West is an interesting place, great for people watching, and I am typing this sitting outside at 10.30pm in quite balmy weather (it reminds me a bit of Singapore – most likely because I also spent balmy nights outside there [no Singapore Sling today, though!]) on the side of a swimming pool. (Yep, life if good, right now!).

I declinded joining the – hopping – Key West nightlife. Staying out till 9.30pm is late enough for me, when the day has been full and long and tomorrow promises to be the same: tomorrow I shall spend the day sailing, snorkling and kayaking (three-in-one), and I am taking my  as of yet half-empty one-way disposable underwater camera along, so expect more less-than-sterling underwater photos at some point in the future.

On the way to Key West

I’ve also booked *all* the special interest tours that are happening right now at the Kennedy Space Center, on the theory of ‘when in Rome’/one does not get back to ‘Rome’ too often/&c. So, uh, sorry, rest of Florida. It’s gonna be the Keys and then the Canaveral region and then motor it up to Atlanta. Next time?

Obligatory photo is obligatory!

Sunday, November 6th, 2011

Whimsical levels of artifice

So, the dancing was … somewhere on the slippery slope between weird and cool, I am not quite sure which ultimately won. Or would have won, had there not been a conscious decision at some point to simply accept that all the music there was ever going to be that evening would be stuff to which a strong and loud 4/4 artificial beat had been added via the inclusion of an electronic drum kit – and the beat was of the same speed, too, always. Basically, you could start moving in a certain pattern and stop three hours later, without variation having been called for. Also, it’s possible to do really horrible things to “Tubular Bells”. Aside from that one trick pony the guy who did the sampling was not without skill, and the people there all seemed to really enjoy themselves. It kind of felt like a student party at someone’s house (who happens to have a large empty room with a plywood floor), but it’s 20 years later and everyone has aged accordingly, yet the location and the music remains the same (well, plus the added beat).  It definitely didn’t beat surfing across the dancefloor to the Beach Boys, though. (Not that there were any chairs.) Will I go back? Who knows!